Month: September 2016

Tamer of Horses by Amalia Carosella

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My Review:

I was a big fan of the Helen of Sparta series and really liked the character Pirithous, so I’m glad that he got his own book. This book did not disappoint it was just as good as the Helen series and may even be better. The characters were great and I enjoyed reading their lives and adventures. The epilogue had me in tears, I was sad for Pirithous as I came to care about him and his family. I became so entralled in the story that I forgot that this was before the Helen of Sparta series and was on the edge of my seat to see what happens to Pirithous. Overall a really great job and I enjoyed reading this, I can’t wait to see what’s next from the author.

5 out of 5 stars

Description:

More than two decades before the events of Helen of Sparta…

Abandoned as a baby, Hippodamia would have died of exposure on the mountain had it not been for Centaurus. The king of the centaurs saved her, raised her as his own, and in exchange asks for only one thing: she must marry the future king of the Lapiths, Pirithous, son of Zeus, and forge a lasting peace between their peoples by giving him an heir. It would be a fine match if Pirithous weren’t more pirate than king and insufferably conceited, besides. But Hippodamia can hardly refuse to marry him without betraying every hope her people have for peace.

After the death of Dia, queen of the Lapiths, tensions are running high. The oaths and promises protecting the Lapith people from the Myrmidons have lapsed, and the last thing Pirithous needs is to begin his kingship by making new enemies. But not everyone wants peace on the mountain. There are those among the centaurs who feel it comes at too high a price, and Peleus, King of the Myrmidons, lusts for the lush valley of the Lapiths and the horses that graze within it. Pirithous needs a strong queen at his side, and Hippodamia will certainly be that—if he can win her loyalties.

But no matter their differences, neither Hippodamia nor Pirithous expected their wedding banquet to be the first battle in a war.

This book comes out October 3rd 2016

A Feast Of Sorrows Stories by Angela Slatter

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My Review:

This is a great collection of twisted fairy tales, each story was written perfectly and spooky. I loved the stories Dresses, Three and Bluebeard’s Daughter, they were my favorites in the collection. Each story you can figure out the fairy tale it was based on and then Ms. Slatter was able to twist it to a darker place. Overall I really enjoyed reading this and would recommend this to fans of dark fairy tales.

5 out of 5 stars

Description:

For the Most Beautiful by Emily Hauser

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My Review:

This was such a fun book, I loved that it was an untold tale of the Trojan wars. Some of my favorite genre is Greek Mythology, and this did not disappoint me. What was cool was that we got to see the Greek gods perspective during a few chapters what I liked about the Greek Gods was that they were portrayed as selfish and doing things for their desires. I also really liked the character Cassandra. The story itself was amazing and wonderfully written, I also liked that there were actual Greek words in the book. Overall I really enjoyed reading this and would recommend it to fans of mythology or the Trojan War.

5 out of 5 stars

Description

Spindle by Shonna Slayton

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My Review:

I really enjoyed reading this, it had the right amount of fairy tale elements and real world elements that was needed. I had enjoyed Ms. Slayton’s Cinderella’s Dress series so I looked forward to her interpretation of my favorite fairy tale Sleeping Beauty and she did not disappoint. I loved Mim and Briar, one of my favorite parts is when Briar could automatically tell she wasn’t welcome in a place because she was Irish, it was an emotional scene that showed the prejudice of the time. It was a wonderful novel that not only works as a fairy tale but a historical novel as well!

5 out of 5 stars

Description:

Merm-8 by Eric J. Juneau

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Description:

Gene, a mariner-for-hire, just found a mermaid trapped in his ship’s intake port. After ocean levels rose, Gene thought scavenging the flooded Earth would be a decent living. But he never expected this. Where did she come from? Why won’t she go back in the water? Is she a product of genetic engineering or the real thing?

And when the world discovers a real fantasy creature, chaos erupts. Corporations want to exploit her. Old friends want to capitalize on her fame. Marauders are sinking any ships that get in their way of her.

As her only friend, Gene must save them both by returning her home. But the trip back involves diving into a world of more than just mermaids. And a secret that, in the wrong hands, could destroy the remainder of mankind.

My Review:

I had so much fun reading this book, I loved the various mythological creatures that appeared in the book. My favorite thing was the relationship between Stitch, Gene and Ginger, it was so sweet and I thought they had a great connection. I felt so bad for Gene, he seems like such a good guy and the end is so bitter sweet. I loved the connection of Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid and this story, I knew the tale and still didn’t see the end coming. Overall a really great story and I enjoyed reading this.

5 out of 5 stars

The Bad Babysitter Chillz Hillz #1 by Kerrigan Valentine

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Description:

Brad whines. He fights. He does terrible things with his boogars. Andrew is tired of his little brother. But when their family moves to the strange city of Chills Hills and Brad goes to a new babysitter, he comes back . . . different. Almost robotic. All he wants to do now is chores and homework. Mom and Dad think he’s just growing up. But Andrew knows something is very wrong, and it all started on that day at Mrs. Dritch’s house. There is dark magic at work here. His investigation leads him closer and closer to the truth . . . but also into the heart of danger.

My Review:

I enjoyed reading this book, it brought me back to when I would read Goosebumps or Fear Street, this was a fun spooky story. The character of Andrew worked perfectly as the main character, I really felt for him and enjoyed reading him figure out what was happening to the children of Chillz Hillz. I look forward to the next book in the series to see where this is going but overall this was a really good first part.

5 out of 5 stars

Girl Number One by Jane Holland

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Description:

There’s a body in the woods. At least, there was. Eleanor Blackwood saw it on her morning run: a young woman, strangled to death.

But the police can find nothing—no body, no sign of a crime—and even Ellie has to wonder if it was a trick of her mind, a gruesome vision conjured up by grief. It’s eighteen years to the day since she witnessed her own mother’s murder on the same woodland spot. But what if she really did see what she thinks she saw? What if the body was left there for Ellie alone to find?

And there’s one detail Ellie can’t shake: a deliberate number three on the dead woman’s forehead. When she discovers a second body, this one bearing the number two, Ellie is convinced they are not messages but threats. The killer is on a countdown: but who is girl number one?

This book comes out September 27th, 2016

My Review:

This is such a good mystery, it had me guessing up til the end. I loved Eleanor, and really felt for her character when the body disappeared. That part kinda reminded me of another Eleanor, from the Haunting of Hill House, but I’m glad this Eleanor was able to show proof of the murders. The reveal of the killer was great, and I almost felt bad for the killer. All of the characters were really interesting and I didn’t want any of them to die. Overall it was a really good read that I would recommend to fans of mystery and I look forward to more from Ms. Holland.

5 out of 5 stars

Seven Sovereign Queens by Geoffrey Trease

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Description:

“It was an odd family to be born into. When not marrying, they were murdering one another.”

Here are the personal stories of sovereign queens and empresses famous in world history, expertly chosen by Geoffrey Trease not only for their historical importance but also for their dramatic personalities and their intriguing personal lives.

Their reigns span time from the ancient world to the 18th century, from Cleopatra to Catherine the Great

Trease vividly recreates settings ranging from Christina’s Sweden to Isabella’s Spain, and from Roman Britain to the Vienna of Maria Theresa.

The author’s customary insight and inviting style bring his subjects to life not only as outstanding rulers but as women whose stories have fascinated the world.

Seven Sovereign Queens is an engaging collection of biographies full of excitement and human interest.

My Review:

This book was interesting and well-researched, the author was able to keep the book interesting. I enjoyed reading about Galla Placidia as I’ve never knew about this Queen. Mr. Trease was able make the remaining Queens biographies interesting and wasn’t just rehashing the same thing. Overall I really enjoyed reading this and look forward to more from this author.

5 out of 5 stars

Light Come Shining by Andrew McCarron

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Description:

Bob Dylan is the prince of self-reinvention and deflection. Whether it’s the folkies of Greenwich Village, the student movement of the 1960s and 1970s, Born Again Christians, the Chabad Lubavitch community, or English Department postmodernists, specific intellectual and sociopolitical groups have repeatedly claimed Bob Dylan as their spokesperson. But in the words of filmmaker Todd Haynes, who cast six actors to depict different facets of Dylan’s life and artistic personae in his 2009 film I’m Not There, “The minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he’s no longer where he was.”

In Light Come Shining, writer Andrew McCarron uses psychological tools to examine three major turning points – or transformations – in Bob Dylan’s life: the aftermath of his 1966 motorcycle “accident,” his Born Again conversion in 1978, and his recommitment to songwriting and performing in 1987. With fascinating insight, McCarron reveals how a common script undergirds Dylan’s self-explanations of these changes; and, at the heart of this script, illuminates a fascinating story of spiritual death and rebirth that has captivated us all for generations.

This book comes out February 1st, 2017

My Review:

This was a really fun read! I loved how well-written this was about Bob Dylan, it felt like the author knew what he was talking about and kept it interesting. I liked the use of lyrics in the book, it really helped to keep me interested. It gave insight to Bob Dylan’s mind and more of his life that’s not really talked about. Overall I really enjoyed reading this and would recommend this to fans of Bob Dylan or biographies.

5 out of 5 stars